Brian Bull

Reporter & Interim News Director

Brian Bull joined the KLCC News Team in June 2016.   Over his 21 years in public broadcasting, he's worked at NPR, Twin Cities Public Television, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Radio, and ideastream in Cleveland. His reporting has netted dozens of accolades, including three national Edward R. Murrow Awards,  the Ohio Associated Press' Best Reporter Award in 2012, and most recently the PRNDI/NEFE Award for Excellence in Consumer Finance Reporting.

An enrolled member of the Nez Perce Tribe, Bull has worked with NPR's NextGeneration project geared towards diversifying the ranks of tomorrow's journalists, and has been a guest faculty at the Poynter Institute on covering underrepresented communities.

He's glad to be home in the Pacific Northwest, close to his family, tribe, and the Oregon Coast. He's married and has three children, and three cats. He enjoys photography, hiking, cooking, the visual and performing arts, and the occasional Godzilla movie.

Read how Brian's desire to spur reflection led him to a career in public media.

Brian has worked through the years with NPR on its Next Generation Radio Project, which trains journalists from underrepresented communities to become tomorrow's reporters.  Check out his latest project with Capital Public Radio in Sacramento here: http://capradio2017.nextgenerationradio.org/

Ways to Connect

Mark Nozell / Flickr.com

Today at least 350 newspapers and assorted media groups – including some in Oregon - are speaking out against President Trump’s routine attacks on the press. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Cottage Grove Chamber of Commerce

It’s been 40 years since the landmark comedy film “Animal House” was released. This weekend, commemorative events are happening in Eugene and Cottage Grove, where many scenes were shot. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Oregon Department of Forestry

Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management is collaborating with other state agencies to further raise fire prevention awareness.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports the goal is to reduce human-caused fires.

Matt Emrich / Cottage Theatre

A community theatre in Cottage Grove will be remodeling soon, helped in part by a $40,075 grant.

Eugene-Springfield Firefighters / Instagram

UPDATE, POSTED 6:34pm 8/14/2018: Dawn Barth, Emergency and Risk Management Coordinator for Lane Community College, says 30th Avenue is now open and that responders will continue to monitor the area where a grass fire burned around 4pm today.

Posted 5:31pm, 8/14/2018:  A grass fire burning near East 30th Avenue and Spring Boulevard in South Eugene is under control.  However, drivers are urged to avoid the area if possible.  East 30th is expected to stay closed in both directions until 6:00pm Tuesday night.

NASA/Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr.

In the pre-dawn hours Sunday morning, the Parker Solar Probe blasted off from Cape Canaveral.  Among those watching was an astrophysicist who worked on the unique spacecraft…who’s also a Springfield native and survivor of the 1998 Thurston School Shooting. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

OSU

Construction has resumed on an Oregon State University facility that suffered a collapse last March.

Steffen Geyer / Flickr.com

Oregon has more cannabis than it can sell, and that’s causing prices to plummet. That from an industry firm tracking cannabis trends. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Is your job stressing you out? Or relationship issues?  How about those politics? There are many things that can get Oregonians uptight, frustrated, even angry. A Glenwood business says it has just the outlet for those needing to blow-off steam. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on “Demolition Zone”…which hopes to become a smashing success. 

Lane County Sheriff's Office

Eleven years after a rape in Lane County, a suspect is in custody, thanks to DNA lab work.

Officials say 37-year-old Jesse Clark of Junction City was arrested last week, after a match for his DNA was found in an unrelated case, recently.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Many people are familiar with the forced relocation of Cherokee Indians in the 1830s, which led to the deaths of over 4,000 people. Now a play about Oregon’s own “Trail of Tears” opens Thursday night in Salem. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

TJ Gehling / Flickr.com

You may have noticed more and more yellowjackets hovering around your home, but an Oregon State University bug expert says to be calm, careful, and kind. KLCC’s Brian Bull has more.

Fireground/Fee-Technophile / Flickr.com

As fire fighting season continues, forest and aviation officials are calling on drone operators to keep their unmanned aerial systems grounded. KLCC’s Brian Bull has more.

Junction City Police

Junction City police are asking for leads on who sprayed racist graffiti on a local residence.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The new mascot for South Eugene High School is now prominently part of the campus’ renovation.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Oregon’s history with the First Nations remains an often overlooked part of the state’s checkered legacy. But more and more, Native Americans and their supporters are highlighting aspects of Oregon’s pioneer era that may not jibe with tourist signs and old school textbooks. One story is that of Amanda Du-Cuys. U.S. soldiers put the Coos Indian and others on a forced march up the coastline in the 1860s.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how her story is being shared today.

Brian Bull

KLCC presents a year-long series on Native Voices of Oregon beginning July, 2018. 

Funded by the University of Oregon's Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, the stories coincide with the Center's 2017-2019 Theme of Inquiry: Borders, Migration and Belonging. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

In the early 2000s, there were around 9,000 Blockbuster Video stores.  But now there’s only one left in the United States.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, changes in the movie rental industry have led to the closure of all U.S. stores, except for one in the central Oregon city of Bend.

Brian Bull / KLCC

With Lane County's mosquito population more than double than average this year, visitors at the Oregon Country Fair may expect to get nibbled by these voracious bugs. But not everyone is comfortable with using over-the-counter sprays and repellents.  That's where one vendor, Soule Ahlenbach, comes in.  She's helping keep fairgoers bite-free by pitting Mother Nature against Mother Nature.  KLCC's Brian Bull checked in with her on the OCF's opening day.

Brian Bull / KLCC

As the Oregon Country Fair commences, organizers are urging visitors to keep hydrated, stay cool, and pace themselves. While many temps are going to be in the upper 90s,  that heat wave means cold cash for those selling wares that can keep fairgoers cool and refreshed.  KLCC's Brian Bull checked in with one such vendor, Orange You Glad I Didn't Say 'Banana'?, right as the admission gates were opening this morning.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The Oregon Country Fair turns 50 next year.  Organizers are mum about what they’ll do to celebrate the event’s golden anniversary. Meanwhile, another local fixture also marks half a century in 2019, as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Supporting local growers, and demonstrating sustainability permeate much of the Oregon Country Fair. There’s a heavy emphasis on not producing or leaving much waste on the grounds. KLCC’s Brian Bull talked to a fair official about how well they’ve managed to reduce environmental impacts.

Oregon Country Fair

Fun fact about the Oregon Country Fair – through a good part of the year, the site is underwater.  Often, things are pretty dry by the time the first fairgoer walks through the entrance.  KLCC’s Brian Bull asked one of the fair officials about how the event handles this recurring natural disaster, including those unusual fences.

Johan J. Ingles Le-Nobel / Flickr.com

Visitors to the Oregon Country Fair might want to bring along bug spray as well as sunscreen.  Lane County’s mosquito population has more than doubled due to recent, mild weather…and the bloodthirsty skeeters have no qualms about crashing the event. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The Oregon Country Fair tries to cover all the bases when it comes to visitor comfort and safety. The White Bird Clinic has two sites that address the physical and mental well-being of fairgoers.  KLCC’s Brian Bull met with Wren Arrington, Rock Medicine Event Coordinator for the White Bird Clinic. Bull began by asking Arrington what help the clinic can provide, and where.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Beginning Friday, an estimated 45,000 people will gather in Veneta for the annual Oregon Country Fair. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’s a long-standing tradition for many.

Fabrizo Pece / Flickr.com

The first round of student loan repayments have been awarded, in a program designed to boost the number of health care providers in underserved and rural communities in Oregon. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Sloan Poe / Flickr.com

It’s not just smoke from fireworks that clears up on the Fifth of July.  It’s also grass pollen, giving allergy sufferers across the Willamette Valley greater independence from sneezing fits and watery eyes. KLCC’s Brian Bull explains.

pops / Flickr.com

Two places in Oregon are expected to be major areas of economic growth, according to the Oregon Employment Department.

ElectroSawHQ / Flickr.com

Oregon is experiencing continued job growth and record low unemployment. However, as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, there’s challenges ahead.

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