Earthquake preparedness

Recorded On: March 9, 2018

Air Date: March 12, 2018

Over the last few decades, advancement in our understanding of the dynamics of the earth's surface and the geology of the Cascadia region has revealed that this region is subject to high intensity earthquakes. This is a result of the collision of large elements of the earth's crust called plates. Earthquakes of this type occur less frequently than those from horizontally moving faults like the San Andreas, but they are often of much larger magnitude.

Liz Roll/FEMA News Photo

Last week’s earthquake in Mexico provided another reminder about the risks of poorly reinforced buildings.

shakealert.org

The Federal government has allocated $3.7 million for an earthquake early warning system for the west coast. The U-S Geological Survey awarded additional grant money to the University of Oregon.

Recorded on: April 30th, 2016

Air Date: May 2nd, 2016
 

Speakers:

Krista Dillon: University of Oregon Director of Emergency Management and Fire Prevention

Steve McGuire: Lane County Building Program Manager

Carlos Barrera: Lane County Building Program Manager

Last year's Pulitzer Prize winning New Yorker Magazine article, "The Really Big One," has awakened us to the reality that a huge disaster is in our future. We know it is inevitable, but not whether it will happen tomorrow or years in the future. How bad will it be?

The Great Oregon ShakeOut

On October 15th Oregonians will join the world’s largest earthquake drill. Over 40 million people worldwide are expected to participate in the Great Shake Out at 10:15 in the morning. Part of the Cascadia Subduction Zone is located in Oregon; experts say it is due for an earthquake and tsunami similar to the 2011 one in Japan. Visit the Great ShakeOut website  for more information and to register.

oregonstate.edu

September is National Preparedness Month and a series of emergency response events has been taking place across the state. Tomorrow (Tuesday) congressman Peter DeFazio will host an earthquake early warning roundtable at the U of O.

As the ranking member of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Congressman DeFazio introduced a federal bill to fund an earthquake early warning system for the west coast. The roundtable is an official committee hearing. Scott Ashford, Dean of Engineering at OSU, studies the effects to utilities and services in an emergency:

OPB

Oregon's Democratic Congressman Peter DeFazio Tuesday introduced a bill to fund an earthquake early warning system for the Pacific Northwest.

The system would trigger automatic shutdowns of trains, manufacturing lines, close bridges and evacuate students from unsafe schools.

DeFazio says the system could save thousands of lives in the case of a major earthquake and tsunami.

OPB.org

This week's New Yorker article "The Really Big One" has served as a wake up call to northwest residents to the reality that a major earthquake is expected to hit in the next 50 years. Oregon Emergency Managers want to use this opportunity to help people prepare.

Jenny Demaris is Emergency Manager for Lincoln County on the Oregon Coast. She says after reading or hearing about the article, people took notice.

New Maritime Guide Helps Boaters Prepare For Tsunami

Jun 4, 2015
www.oregongeology.org

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries published a tsunami guide for fisherman, mariners and boaters on Tuesday. The recent earthquakes off the coast of Oregon did not produce any tsunamis, but the guide lets boaters know how they should be prepared.

The guide is brand new says Ali Ryan with the department of Geology. She says depending on where boaters are in the event of a local or distant tsunami determines whether they should evacuate or go out to sea.

John Rosman / OPB

The Johnsons are aware that scientists predict a megaquake could hit Oregon at any time. But like many households in the state, they don’t feel prepared. OPB followed the couple on a recent weekend as they tried to live off their emergency supplies.

Amelia Templeton / OPB

Experts say a magnitude nine earthquake off the Northwest coast could hit anytime. When it does, the Stephens family hopes to be resilient.
As part of OPB's "Living Off Your Kit" weekend we followed John and Megan and their two kids as they simulated a quake and lived off their emergency supplies.
The family learned they may be the only people on their block with an adequate supply of drinking water.

Alan Sylvestre / OPB

Experts say a megaquake off the Northwest coast could hit anytime. When it does, many of us may struggle to find safe shelter, connect with loved ones, and secure enough food and water to get by. This could be especially difficult for vulnerable populations.
As part of  OPB's "Living Off Your Kit" weekend, we followed a woman in Troutdale who has little income and lives with disabilities, as she simulated what  life would be like if she had to live off her emergency supplies.