All Things Considered

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All Things Considered brings you breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and offbeat features.

KLCC Weekday Hosts - Angela Kellner
NPR Weekday Hosts - Audie Cornish, Ari Shapiro, Mary Louise Kelly, Ailsa Chang
NPR Weekend Host - Michel Martin

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And now let's turn to the mayor of one of those cities where the administration is sending federal forces. Tim Keller is mayor of Albuquerque, N.M., and he is a Democrat.

Welcome to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

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Idaho was the second-to-last state to announce a confirmed coronavirus case in March. Now, less than four months later, cases are rising rapidly, and the state is nearing the top of the list of the nation's biggest hot spots.

About half of the roughly 15,000 confirmed cases in the state have come in the past two weeks and the case count has quadrupled since mid-June. That has prompted hospital leaders near the capital of Boise to sound the alarm, as they're starting to see the spike in cases translate to increased hospital admissions.

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Federal agents from the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Marshals Service and elsewhere have been in the streets of Portland, Ore., for at least a few weeks, where they've been clashing with protesters demonstrating over racial injustice and police brutality.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and local officials have downplayed any coordination between those federal forces and the Portland Police Bureau.

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It is back. After a three-month hiatus, President Trump resurrected his briefing about the coronavirus tonight. And there was a big shift in his tone.

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Rina Sawayama's self-titled debut album is a complex work of pop music, often calling to mind early 2000s R&B, nu-metal, and shuffling between genres in the same song. In the same way she flips through sounds, Sawayama also sings about a lot of complicated topics: her parents' messy divorce, her identity as Japanese British person and her burgeoning understanding of systemic racism, which she says she experienced while studying psychology, sociology and politics at Cambridge University.

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We're going to begin today by remembering Congressman John Lewis, a titan of the civil rights movement and a moral force in Congress and the life of the nation. He died Friday night after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 80 years old.

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Remembering Georgia Congressman John Lewis

Jul 18, 2020

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Millions of American workers have been receiving $600 from the federal government each week during the pandemic in the form of unemployment assistance. But that's set to expire by the end of the month, leaving many in a high state of anxiety.

In the inaugural season of Play It Forward, we've followed a musical chain of gratitude across genre, regions and time. First up was Dan Snaith, the Canadian indie-electronic auteur who records as Caribou.

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Rev. C.T. Vivian spent his life fighting for racial justice. In 1947, he held a sit-in at a lunch counter in Peoria, Ill., 13 years before the well-known sit-ins in Greensboro, N.C.

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The sex lives of people in Morocco are shaped by cultural forces — and also the penal code. Sex outside marriage is illegal, and so is abortion in almost all cases. Adultery is punishable by prison time. And as for violating Morocco's cultural laws — those punishments fall mostly on women.

The French-Moroccan writer Leila Slimani explores the places where desire, intimacy and the patriarchy collide in her new book, Sex and Lies: True Stories of Women's Intimate Lives in the Arab World.

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The U.S. has a coin shortage. And as Planet Money's Greg Rosalsky reports, the shortage could be new fodder for an old movement - the campaign to kill the penny.

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Africatown, Ala., was founded by passengers of the last known slave ship to reach the U.S. A Black church in Oklahoma survived the Tulsa race massacre of 1921. And the city of Minneapolis started a worldwide reckoning on racism with protests against the police killing of George Floyd. These are just three of the 27 places and organizations that were awarded grants to preserve Black history in the U.S., grants that were just announced today.

Raphael Bostic, president and CEO of the Atlanta Federal Reserve Bank, says racism is a danger to the health of America's economy.

In a recent opinion piece, Bostic reflected on the recent protests against police brutality that he says are fueled, in part, by economic inequalities that stem from systemic racism.

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