american indians

The Confluence Library

Greater access to indigenous culture has been made available to educators and students across the Pacific Northwest.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on the launch of The Confluence Library.

Photo provided by Migizi Pensoneau

The Native American comedy troupe, The 1491s, is an intertribal group of comedians who have regularly satirized, lampooned, parodied, and teased many aspects of Indian life.  This includes digs at Westward Expansion as well as more contemporary topics, like New Age Shamanism and Hollywood depictions of the First Nations.  Well-established on YouTube, the five members have committed much of their energy recently on their first theatrical production, Between Two Knees, which premiered this past weekend at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) in Ashland, Oregon.

KLCC's Brian Bull caught up with The 1491s after their final preview performance, and interviewed them about their thoughts on crossing from online comedy to the stage.

Jenny Graham / Oregon Shakespeare Festival

For years, the Native American comedy troupe, The 1491s, have shared their irreverent, raunchy, and provocative humor on YouTube. Now – as KLCC’s Brian Bull reports - they’ve officially shifted from video skits to their first theatrical production here in Oregon.

Brian Bull / KLCC

When Native Americans ceded their lands during the treaty era, much of it was forest. Today, many tribes – including those in Oregon – are not only working to regain some of those forests, they’re getting national recognition for their sustainable management practices.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs / Flickr.com

The federal government is failing to meet its obligations to Native American tribes, according to a new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the shortcomings affect many major areas for tribes, including those in Oregon.

Alane Golden / Flickr.com

The term “Two Spirit” in Native American culture often describes a person possessing both male and female spirits.  And they’ve been around well before the Santa Maria or the Mayflower dropped anchor. And while “Two Spirit” has been used for Indians who identify as gay, bisexual, or transgender…many say there’s more to it than that. KLCC’s Brian Bull explores a community that’s finding its voice again after generations of oppression, prejudice, and oversight.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Oregon’s Native American students largely struggle to keep pace with their non-Indian peers.  Graduation rates and attendance are low, while dropouts are high. In this months’ segment for the series, “Native Voices of Oregon” KLCC’s Brian Bull talks to Indian educators about the challenges their students face, and what’s being done to brighten their prospects.

Isa Anastasia Zito

This weekend marks the golden anniversary of a major cultural event at the University of Oregon.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the 50th Annual Mother’s Day Pow-Wow is also expected to receive special recognition.

Jason Mrachina / Flickr.com

While Oregon’s high school graduation rate has improved, minority students – especially Native Americans – still lag behind their white classmates. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull / KLCC

For the first time in its 45-year history, the 4-J School District’s NATIVES program has started work on a totem pole.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Teddy Llovet / Flickr.com

After months of input and deliberation, the Marcola School District is closer to having a new, official mascot.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’ll replace the “Mohawk Indians” which had been the mascot for 90 years.  

Video still from grandronde.org / Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde

Efforts to end Native American mascots – or keep them, with local tribes’ approval – have left 16 Oregon school districts until July 1st to act.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

Marcola School District.

Tonight, officials with the Marcola School District and Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde will hold a community meeting.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the topic will be the district’s Native American-themed name and mascot.

Brian Bull / KLCC

A national day of solidarity was held today for Native Americans protesting an oil pipeline project in North Dakota.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, hundreds gathered in downtown Eugene to show their support.