clean water

Brian Bull / KLCC

Oregon lawmakers will return to the Capitol Monday for the first time since June. It's the first round of “Legislative Days” since the whirlwind closing days of the 2019 legislative session.

Oregon State Police

Agencies working to clean up the site of a semi-tanker crash that spilled gasoline into the North Santiam River focused their efforts Sunday on removing contaminated soil along the riverbanks, sampling water intakes downstream, and monitoring air quality.

PeggyDavis66 / Flickr.com

Governor Brown has designated this SepticSmart Week.  This month also marks the first anniversary of a program that’s helped 30 Oregon families repair or replace failing septic systems.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

Bethel School District

An official with Bethel School District in Eugene says recent lead testing has proven the majority of its water sources are safe, and schools will open come September.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull

A review of over 20,000 groundwater sites by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows half of the nation’s states have high --to very high-- potential to become corrosive.  As KLCC's Brian Bull reports, this includes Oregon and Washington.

Scott McGuffin

Arsenic in drinking water supplies is a worldwide problem. A discovery by scientists at the University of Oregon could lead to a new way to remove the toxic chemical, making groundwater supplies safer for communities.

Call it a cleanse. Or detoxification. That’s basically the process happening in groundwater, identified by University of Oregon geology professor Qusheng Jin.

He tested well-water in Creswell, Oregon, and found microbes are naturally transforming toxic water-born arsenic into a gas that can rise and get trapped in the soil, where it’s less of a problem.