compost

Anni Katz

As of Tuesday, October 1st, Eugene residents can put food scraps in their curbside yard waste bins for composting. The hope is to reduce the amount of food that goes into the landfill.


City of Eugene

Eugene residents will soon be able to put food scraps in their curbside bin along with yard waste for composting. The city-wide program starts October 1st, 2019.


Brian Bull / KLCC

Supporting local growers, and demonstrating sustainability permeate much of the Oregon Country Fair. There’s a heavy emphasis on not producing or leaving much waste on the grounds. KLCC’s Brian Bull talked to a fair official about how well they’ve managed to reduce environmental impacts.

In the U.S., we waste about 40 percent of all of the food we produce. A lot of that food winds up rotting in landfills and releasing air pollution. But many cities are trying to turn it into something more valuable and less harmful to the environment. EarthFix reporter Cassandra Profita kicks off our series of reports this week on food waste by exploring the virtues of curbside composting:

The annual Whitaker Dinner is trying to reduce its material waste, and has taken a big step towards doing so through reusable silverware. 

The Lane County Master Recycler program came up with the idea of acquiring metal utensils about 3 years  ago and finally reached their goal last month. 3,000 forks, 1,500 knives and 1,200 spoons have been collected to be used by the more than 2,000 people who attend the banquet. Coordinator Kelly Bell is glad to have their own set after relying on others for so long.