confederated tribes of the coos lower umpua and siuslaw indians

Doc Slyter / Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians

Construction is wrapping up on a special fish ladder at Eel Creek north of Coos Bay.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull explains, it’s to help the regional lamprey population rebound.

Dave Herasimtschuk, Fresh Waters Illustrated / USFWS Pacific Region, Flickr.com

Lamprey populations across the Pacific Northwest have fallen in the past half century. An Oregon State University estimate says they are at 5 to 10 percent of their numbers half a century ago. Conservation officials and Native American tribes say this is troubling because of lampreys’ importance to the ecosystem. Now an effort is underway to monitor the numbers of these eel-like fish in southern coastal Oregon, to help researchers learn about their migration patterns and challenges.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Oregon’s history with the First Nations remains an often overlooked part of the state’s checkered legacy. But more and more, Native Americans and their supporters are highlighting aspects of Oregon’s pioneer era that may not jibe with tourist signs and old school textbooks. One story is that of Amanda Du-Cuys. U.S. soldiers put the Coos Indian and others on a forced march up the coastline in the 1860s.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how her story is being shared today.

Coquille Indian Tribe

A major piece of legislation championed by Congressman Peter DeFazio has cleared both houses of Congress, that – if enacted - will benefit three Native American tribes in Oregon. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Roy W. Lowe / USFWS / Flickr.com

Three Oregon Indian tribes are closely watching legislation as it moves through Capitol Hill.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on the Western Oregon Tribal Fairness Act, which just passed the House of Representatives.