Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde

Karen Richards

 

Oregon has many historic and geological sites with informative signage. What’s been missing until recently is much recognition of the time before Lewis and Clark. There’s momentum now to tell a deeper history of the state.


Karen Richards

 

All nine Oregon tribes have Cultural Resources departments. Some have archaeologists on staff, others have museums or archives. In recent years, the number of donations of cultural artifacts is soaring. Here's the next installment of our “Native Oregon Voices” series.


Brian Bull / KLCC

When Native Americans ceded their lands during the treaty era, much of it was forest. Today, many tribes – including those in Oregon – are not only working to regain some of those forests, they’re getting national recognition for their sustainable management practices.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs / Flickr.com

The federal government is failing to meet its obligations to Native American tribes, according to a new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the shortcomings affect many major areas for tribes, including those in Oregon.

Karen Richards

All over Oregon, words that haven't been said out loud for generations are being spoken again. The work to revitalize native languages has accelerated in recent years, and scholars hope their efforts will yield generations of new speakers.

 

  

Karen Richards

Many Oregon place names have Native American roots. Some of them teach lessons about the land and its history, others are more like a game of “telephone” played over time. Here are a few stories about local place names.  


www.coquilletribe.org

The National Park Service and Interior Department have announced $60 million in historic preservation grants to states and tribes, including Oregon. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Michelle Alaimo/courtesy of Smoke Signals

The Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde are celebrating the return of 16 artifacts from Europe. As KLCC’s Brian Bull explains, the items are back after nearly 120 years…but aren’t home permanently.

Michelle Alaimo, www.granderonde.org

Three Oregon Indian tribes have received more than a million dollars from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, it’s part of a larger award that’s to benefit tribes nationwide.

Marcola High School

Some Oregon public schools will be allowed to keep their Native American Mascots…at least for now. The State Board of Education last week said that’s only if they secure permission from a tribe. One of those schools is in the Mohawk Valley—KLCC’s Tiffany Eckert speaks with the superintendent of Marcola School District.