drones

inciweb

Amid the turmoil in Washington last week over Brett Kavanaugh, President Trump signed a re-authorization of the Federal Aviation Administration. Oregon Democratic Representative Peter DeFazio says this is good news for consumers and firefighters.

Oregon State University / Marine Mammal Institute, OSU

It’s common for kids to do headstands and blow bubbles. But whales? Marine researchers are seeing these creatures in a different light thanks to unmanned aerial systems, better known as drones. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

U.S. Forest Service / USDA

Forest officials say nationwide, at least 19 incidents involving drones and fire-fighting aircraft have happened this year. And they’re rebuking suggestions fire crews simply shoot them down.

Fireground/Fee-Technophile / Flickr.com

As fire fighting season continues, forest and aviation officials are calling on drone operators to keep their unmanned aerial systems grounded. KLCC’s Brian Bull has more.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The National Park Service is trying to crack down on drones being flown over popular sites, including Oregon’s Crater Lake.

Jeso Carneiro / Flickr.com

The role of unmanned aerial systems – or drones – in urban combat situations is being developed by the U.S. Defense Department, with the help of an Oregon State University professor.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

State Farm / Flickr.com

Eugene-area operators of unmanned aerial systems – or “drones” – can now learn FAA regulations for commercial ventures.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.  

Brian Bull / KLCC

Timber remains a $40 billion industry in the Pacific Northwest, with logging trucks and mills regular sights across Oregon and Washington.  And like many industries, timber is adopting new technologies to improve efficiency, safety and productivity.  KLCC’s Brian Bull explores the latest “cutting edge” tech.

Mauricio Lima / Flickr.com

Unmanned Aerial Systems – better known as drones – are swarming in popularity.  The Federal Aviation Administration expects drone sales to climb from 2.5 million in 2016, to seven million in 2020.  That’s a lot of drones in the air.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, some hope safety keeps pace with all of the enthusiasm.