Oregon schools

Image by Wokandapix from Pixabay

Students in the Corvallis School District will take classes remotely for the first six weeks of the school year.

Oregon Schools Make COVID-Impacted Plans

Jul 16, 2020
Karen Richards

Oregon school districts are required to have a plan in place for the ’20/’21 school year by August 1st. Mapleton Superintendent and elementary school Principal Jodi O’Mara explains, “There’s three different models to choose from as a district when you make your plan. There’s the on-site, there’s the hybrid which is on-site and online, and then there’s the comprehensive distance learning.”

Elizabeth Gabriel / KLCC News

 

With the Black Lives Matter movement causing people to reevaluate the continuance of systemic racism, KLCC is creating a series that examines the successes and failures of Oregon schools with regards to race, and what schools can do to be more inclusive.

Rachael McDonald

All Oregon school districts now have access to funds allowing them to purchase locally grown food. The Oregon Legislature voted to provide an additional 3.3 million dollars to the Farm to School Program.

Eighty percent of the total funding will be accessible for any school district to buy food. The rest will be part of a competitive grant program for farm, food and garden based education.

Farm to School program director Megan Kemple says some Lane County schools currently participate in farm education programs.

Bethel School District

In a letter to state legislators from Lane County, local school superintendents say the K-12 budget proposed for the next two years is "woefully inadequate".  The $7.3 billion spending plan is headed for votes in the full House and Senate, likely next week.

Colt Gill is superintendent of Bethel School District in Eugene. He says the district is preparing to offer state-mandated full-day kindergarten in September. It's also trying to keep up with rising costs of maintaining the district's services.

This week is spring break for all the major universities and school districts in Oregon. With that in mind, officials are urging drivers to be extra cautious.

In addition to in-state vacationers, roads may be swelled by travelers from California, which also has many schools on break. Shelley Snow is with the Oregon Department of Transportation. She says the Fourth of July is the most deadly time on the roads, but drivers shouldn’t be complacent this time of year: