thurston school shooting

Aubrey Bulkeley

In the 21 years since the tragedy at Thurston High School in Springfield, Oregon, school shootings have become more common. In 2018, The Washington Post reported more than 210 thousand students have experienced gun violence at school since Columbine. As a survivor of the Thurston shooting, I take a look back with several classmates to reflect on how that experience has stayed with us.


Brian Bull/inciweb / KLCC/inciweb

The approach of a New Year often makes us reflect on the past one. In the case of KLCC news, there were many major stories, touching on politics to disasters to the arts.  We revisit some of the sounds and voices from just some of the top local stories for 2018.

As the U.S. Supreme Court weighs a petition to revisit the 112-year sentence of convicted school shooter Kip Kinkel, Oregon is imploring the justices to uphold it. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

AP

On May 21, 1998, one of the earliest modern-day school shootings erupted in the rural, working-class community of Springfield, Oregon.  At Thurston High School, freshman Kipland Kinkel opened fire on his classmates, inside a crowded cafeteria. The incident preceded the more infamous Columbine shooting by nearly a year. 

KLCC's Brian Bull created a series of reports, revisiting the tragic events that left four people dead, two dozen wounded, and the community shocked and reeling in the aftermath.  Here are those reports.

SimpleTexting.com

This week, the Springfield community marked the 20th anniversary of the Thurston School Shooting.  The tragedy preceded many technological developments, including smart phones and social media.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Last night, nearly 200 people gathered in Springfield’s William S. Fort Memorial Park to hold a candlelight vigil. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the event was to mark 20 years since the Thurston School Shooting.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Several survivors of the 1998 Thurston High School Shooting gathered with current students today at the Memorial site just off campus.

AP/Register Guard

On this day 20 years ago, one of the earliest modern-day school shootings erupted in the rural, working-class community of Springfield, Oregon.

AP

Monday marks the 20th anniversary of the Thurston High School shooting in Springfield, when teen gunman Kip Kinkel opened fire on his classmates. Two students died and twenty-five more were wounded.  The bodies of Kinkel’s parents were found in their rural home, having been murdered by their son the night before. 

Yesterday, we looked at what some survivors of that day have done since. And today, in the final segment of our three-part series, KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on what Kip Kinkel himself has been reportedly up to while serving a 112-year sentence.

AP/Register Guard

Yesterday, we revisited the Thurston High School shooting of May 21st, 1998…which saw the deaths of two students, gunman Kip Kinkel’s parents, and the wounding of more than two dozen classmates. In today’s segment, we look at how some survivors of the bloody incident have moved on in the 20 years since.


AP

 

20 years ago this Monday, 15-year-old Kipland "Kip" Kinkel peppered the Thurston High School cafeteria with bullets, after wounding two students in a breezeway moments before. When he paused to reload, a group of classmates tackled him to the ground, holding him until authorities arrived.  Police later found Kinkel's parents, Bill and Faith, dead in their rural Springfield home. In all, four people were killed and more than two dozen wounded from what has come to be called the Thurston School Shooting. 

Betina Lynn

Next Monday marks 20 years since Kip Kinkel - a high school student in Springfield -- opened fire on his classmates, killing two and wounding twenty-five others.  Adding to the death toll were Kinkel’s parents, both shot dead by their son the night before.  The Thurston High incident was one of the earliest modern-day school shootings, preceding Columbine by nearly a year. KLCC’s Brian Bull revisits the tragedy. 

Springfield Police/OSCI

The Oregon Supreme Court says that a mass shooter’s 112-year sentence does not violate his constitutional rights. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the ruling comes as the 20th anniversary nears for the Thurston High School shooting in Springfield.