Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics

Colby K. Neal/BLM Public Affairs / National Interagency Fire Center/Flickr

Fire crews are waging a two-front battle this year: besides the expected slew of wildfires across the Pacific Northwest, they’ll also be keeping COVID-19 at bay, which will prove challenging. As part of our monthly series on Oregon’s resilience and natural resources, this story looks at the pandemic’s effects on seasonal wildfire operations.

Camas Swale Farm

Worldwide, people are working through what it means to be knocked off course and find a new normal, which is one definition of resilience. We’ve been airing a monthly series on Natural Disasters and Preparedness, funded by the UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, but this month we reset our compass. We found some people who deal with uncertainty in their work, and asked what resilience means to them. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Scientists say there’s a 1-in-3 chance of a powerful earthquake hitting the Pacific Northwest in the next 50 years. Residents of the Cascadia Subduction Zone are advised to stockpile two weeks’ worth of water, food, and medical supplies should the “Big One” strike. As part of our series on Oregon's Natural Resources and Resilience funded by the UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, economic disparities already divide those who can readily prepare, and those who will struggle to.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The modern American diet – with its on-the-shelf processed foods in grocery stores, Big Macs and Doritos Locos Tacos at drive-through eateries – has sparked super-sized health problems. That’s bad in itself, but data shows Native Americans suffer higher rates of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease than the general population, and diet is a factor.

There’s been a push among tribes to promote traditional, indigenous foods to offset these issues, as well as instill cultural identity among members.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, this effort isn’t without its challenges.

Alane Golden / Flickr.com

The term “Two Spirit” in Native American culture often describes a person possessing both male and female spirits.  And they’ve been around well before the Santa Maria or the Mayflower dropped anchor. And while “Two Spirit” has been used for Indians who identify as gay, bisexual, or transgender…many say there’s more to it than that. KLCC’s Brian Bull explores a community that’s finding its voice again after generations of oppression, prejudice, and oversight.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Oregon’s history with the First Nations remains an often overlooked part of the state’s checkered legacy. But more and more, Native Americans and their supporters are highlighting aspects of Oregon’s pioneer era that may not jibe with tourist signs and old school textbooks. One story is that of Amanda Du-Cuys. U.S. soldiers put the Coos Indian and others on a forced march up the coastline in the 1860s.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how her story is being shared today.

Brian Bull

KLCC presents a year-long series on Native Voices of Oregon beginning July, 2018. 

Funded by the University of Oregon's Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, the stories coincide with the Center's 2017-2019 Theme of Inquiry: Borders, Migration and Belonging. 

Oregon State University

 

As the six-year anniversary of DACA approaches, KLCC looks at the policy and how it affects Oregonians. One thing many people might not know is that DACA isn't solely a “Mexican immigration” topic.

 


Karen Richards

 

Six years ago Friday (6/15), President Barack Obama signed an executive order calling for deferred action for childhood arrivals. Through the program, some people who came to the U.S. illegally as children are insulated from deportation and allowed work permits. KLCC explains the state of DACA and how it impacts some Oregonians. 

 


Karen Richards

 

While the focus of recent U.S. immigration debate is lately Latino or Muslim countries, migrants from other places are also paying attention. KLCC's Karen Richards spoke to several people in the Eugene area from non-targeted countries and has this report.

 


Karen Richards

Last year, the “Buy American and Hire American” executive order implied skilled worker visas should be harder to get. The H-1B visa goes to a limited number of professionals, most with at least a bachelor's degree. Though largely associated with places like Silicon Valley, Eugene and Springfield are home to dozens of these immigrants. Here, we look at the local impact of the program, and possible effects should it change.


Immigrants Make Mark on Oregon's Economy

Sep 12, 2017
Galvez family

President Trump is proposing cutting legal immigration by half.  The federal government has ramped up arrests of undocumented foreigners.  The dreamers are on hold. Yet in Oregon, immigrants continue to make their mark on the state's economy.

Borders, Migration and Belonging

Aug 10, 2017
tellusnewsdigest.com

Click here for the 2018-2019 series:  Native Voices
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KLCC presents a year-long series on Immigration in Oregon beginning July, 2017.  Stories air monthly during Morning Edition and All Things Considered

Mobile Tool Shop Designed To Help Homeless

Sep 12, 2014
The Common Good's Tumbler page.

Students at the University of Oregon and volunteers with Opportunity Village are unveiling a new mobile workspace Saturday (today). This weekend, it will be parked at the transitional housing community to allow residents to maintain dwellings and fix bicycles.