Name That Celebrity! All You Have To Do Is Rhyme

Aug 21, 2016
Originally published on August 21, 2016 7:35 am

On-air challenge: Each answer today consists of the first and last names of a famous person, each with two syllables. Here are some made-up two-word phrases. The first word in the phrase rhymes with the person's first name, and the last word rhymes with the last name.

For example: Picky Moonie --> MICKEY ROONEY.

Last week's challenge from listener Kenneth Low of Monterey Park, Calif.: Take the name of a country. Among its letters is the name of part of the human body, reading from left to right, although not necessarily consecutively. Cross out these letters. The remaining letters in order, reading left to right, will name part of an animal's body. What country is it?

Answer: Thailand (hand, tail).

Winner: Jed Martinez of Margate, Fla.

Next week's challenge: Name a famous person with the initials B.S. and another famous person with the initials G.M. — whose first and last names, respectively, rhyme with each other. One of the names has one syllable and one has two syllables. Who are these famous people?

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, Aug. 25, at 3 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Last night, I had the strangest dream. I sailed away to China in a little rowboat to find you, and you said you had to get your laundry cleaned. And then you said it's time to play The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: I'm joined now by the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: Remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Kenneth Low of Monterey Park, Calif. I said take the name of a country. Among its letters is the name of part of the human body, reading from left to right, although not necessarily consecutively. And I said cross out these letters, and the remaining letters, in order, left to right, will name part of an animal's body. What country is it? Well, the answer is Thailand. Part of the human body is the hand. Cross out H-A-N-D in Thailand and what's left is tail.

MARTIN: There you go. So we had over 1,100 people send in the correct answer. And our randomly selected winner this week is Jed Martinez of Margate, Fla. He's on the line now. Hey, Jed. Congratulations.

JED MARTINEZ: Thank you, Rachel. I'm really happy about this.

MARTIN: (Laughter) So did this come pretty easily?

MARTINEZ: Oddly enough, it did because usually when I get a tough puzzle challenge, I usually brainstorm with my friends at a restaurant on the same Sunday after listening to the broadcast, and then we each are sending in our entries. But this one, I got it instantaneously the moment I heard the clue.

MARTIN: So now you get to rub it in to your friends because not only did you get it, but then you got picked. So that's kind of cool.

MARTINEZ: Yeah.

MARTIN: Have you been playing The Puzzle a long time?

MARTINEZ: Going all the way back to the postcard days. And just to let everyone know, this is the second time I have won one of these things.

MARTIN: (Laughter) It's happened before. We do get repeat winners. We have a loyal following, and everyone is welcome to submit. And, you know, that's the beauty of the randomly select drawing is that you never know, even people who have won before can win again. So with that, Jed, are you ready to play The Puzzle?

MARTINEZ: Let's go for it.

MARTIN: OK, Will, let's do it.

SHORTZ: All right, Jed and Rachel, each answer today consists of the first and last names of a famous person, each with two syllables. I'm going to give you some made-up two-word phrases. The first word in the phrase rhymes with the person's first name and the last word rhymes with the last name. For example, if I said picky moonie, you would say Mickey Rooney.

MARTINEZ: OK.

SHORTZ: All right, number one is wavy rocket.

MARTINEZ: Wavy - Davy Crockett.

SHORTZ: Davy Crockett is it. Number two is melon seller.

MARTINEZ: Melon seller? This one - that one's going over my head. Any ideas, Rachel?

MARTIN: She was blind...

SHORTZ: Yes. There's a big hint.

MARTIN: ...And deaf.

MARTINEZ: Oh, Helen Keller.

MARTIN: Yes.

SHORTZ: Helen Keller is it. Good one - jolly bunter.

MARTINEZ: Holly Hunter.

MARTIN: Good.

SHORTZ: That's it. Your next one is many dodgers.

MARTIN: Many dodgers.

MARTINEZ: OK, Kenny Rogers.

MARTIN: Good.

SHORTZ: Kenny Rogers is it - muddy dolly.

MARTINEZ: OK, that one, Buddy Holly.

MARTIN: Yep.

SHORTZ: That's it. Mormon tailor.

MARTINEZ: Mormon tailor?

SHORTZ: Yeah.

MARTIN: Oh.

MARTINEZ: Oh, Norman Mailer.

MARTIN: Good.

SHORTZ: That's it - journey landers.

MARTINEZ: Journey landers. Oh, (laughter) Bernie Sanders.

SHORTZ: Bernie Sanders is it. Fancy pagan.

MARTINEZ: Could you repeat that one again?

SHORTZ: Fancy pagan.

MARTINEZ: Oh, OK, I got it. Nancy Reagan.

SHORTZ: That's it - messy Saxon.

MARTINEZ: Oh, Jesse Jackson.

MARTIN: Great.

SHORTZ: That's it - trolley carton.

MARTINEZ: OK, that's - trolley - Dolly Parton.

MARTIN: There you go.

SHORTZ: Dolly Parton. And your last one consists of two geographical names - Haiti Zurich.

MARTIN: Haiti Zurich. Oh.

MARTINEZ: Could you repeat that one?

SHORTZ: Here it is again - Haiti Zurich. Haiti as in the country, Zurich as in the city in Switzerland.

MARTINEZ: Oh, Katie Couric.

MARTIN: Yay, Katie Couric.

SHORTZ: Katie Couric, good job.

MARTIN: Jed, well done. For playing The Puzzle today, you get another WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin. I'm sure you're excited about that because you've won before. You get all kinds of puzzle books and games as well. You can read all about your prizes at npr.org/puzzle. And before we let you go, Jed, where do you hear us? What's your public radio station?

MARTINEZ: I listen on WLRN in Miami.

MARTIN: Jed Martinez of Margate, Fla. Thanks so much for playing The Puzzle, Jed.

MARTINEZ: Thank you, Will, and thank you, Rachel.

MARTIN: OK, Will, what's up for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes, name a famous person with the initials B.S., as in Boy Scouts, and another famous person with the initials G.M., as in General Motors, whose first and last names respectively rhyme with each other. One of the names has one syllable and the other has two syllables. Who are these famous people? So again, two famous people, one with the initials B.S., the other with the initials G.M., and their first and last names respectively rhyme with each other. Who are these two famous people?

MARTIN: When you have figured it out, go to npr.org/puzzle. Click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please, and our deadline for those entries is Thursday, August 25, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time. Don't forget to include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time. And it goes like this - if you're the winner, then we call you and then you get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times, and he is WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks so much, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Rachel. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.