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President Trump signed legislation Saturday extending the deadline for small businesses to apply for the Paycheck Protection Program, enacted in the weeks following the economic shutdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The original deadline to apply for the PPP was this past Tuesday night. But $130 billion still remained in the fund, out of $660 billion allocated. Both houses of Congress approved the extension unanimously earlier this week. With Trump's signature Saturday, businesses will now have until Aug. 8 to apply for the assistance.

More than 3,100 inmates at the Snake River Correctional Institution outside Ontario are under quarantine because of an outbreak of COVID-19 at the facility.

Attorneys say they're unable to reach their clients, many of whom have upcoming hearings.

That puts more than 5,400 inmates, roughly one-third of the state's prison population, on lockdown, unable to leave their cells. Another serious outbreak of the disease remains at the Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem.

UPDATE (12:12 p.m. PT) — The Oregon Health Authority Saturday reported 303 new confirmed and presumptive coronavirus diagnoses, bringing the state to 9,930 known cases.

The health agency is imploring Oregonians to limit unnecessary travel over the holiday weekend, to stay home and avoid congregating in large groups.

Many of Saturday’s new cases are in the Portland metro area, with 58 cases in Multnomah County, 46 cases in Washington County and 26 in Clackamas County. There are also 49 new known cases in Umatilla County.

Movie Interview: 'The Outpost'

2 hours ago

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer discusses the new film The Outpost with director Rod Lurie and co-producer and former Army veteran Henry "Hank" Hughes.

An unfinished story by Louisa May Alcott has recently been published, and now there's a competition to find a writer to finish the story.

NPR's Sacha Pfeiffer speaks with author and medical ethicicst Harriet Washington about the ethical debates surrounding coronavirus vaccine trials in developing countries.

The grim news has taken no respite this Fourth of July.

President Trump has said he had not been told about a suspected Russian bounty program to pay the Taliban to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

At least 15 people are presumed dead and several more are missing after torrential rains pounded southern Japan on Saturday, flooding residential areas, causing mudslides and knocking out power for thousands. Officials asked more than 200,000 people to evacuate.

Fourteen of those found without vital signs were at a nursing home in Kuma village, where water and mud gushed into the building. Japanese medical officials declared that the victims were in "cardio-respiratory arrest" — a term used in Japan before death can be officially certified.

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Two people have been hospitalized, one with life-threatening injuries, after a vehicle barreled past a police barrier and into protesters on a freeway overnight in Seattle.

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Willie Nelson has some new songs on a new album. Do I really need to say anything more than that? It's called "First Rose Of Spring."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FIRST ROSE OF SPRING")

Two new laws went into effect in Idaho this week that target transgender residents. The enactment comes on the heels of a major U.S. Supreme Court decision in June, which greatly expanded LGBTQ rights.

One of the laws bans transgender people from changing the sex on their birth certificates while the other bars transgender girls and women from playing on sports teams that align with their gender identity.

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Independence Day celebrates freedom. And how do you celebrate America's day of independence when it comes during nationwide protests against police brutality, especially if you're a Black American?

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Baseball's Negro Leagues were formally founded a hundred years ago this week. They should never have had to exist — but they sure had some glorious players and times.

Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson, Cool Papa Bell, and many more stars who couldn't play in the major leagues because of the cruelty of segregation engineered a sports enterprise of their own with superb teams that included the Kansas City Monarchs, Chicago American Giants and the Homestead Grays.

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values and indoctrinate our children.

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Nanjiani and Gordon created a film about their very unusual courtship called The Big Sick, so we've invited them to answer three questions about Big Bird. Originally broadcast April 4, 2010.

Janney is now starring in the HBO film Bad Education so we've invited her to answer three questions about the wonderful things people learn from dads. Originally broadcast April 25, 2020.

Since he starred as Mr. Rogers, the nicest neighbor ever, we wrote a game for him called "It's a terrible day in the neighborhood" — three questions about pretty awful neighbors. Originally broadcast April 18, 2020.

The progressive wing of the Democratic Party couldn't break through in the presidential race, but in congressional races, younger, more diverse, progressive candidates are enjoying a recent surge in support.

"The logic of COVID-19 as well as the logic and the righteousness of the movement for Black lives, I think, is forcing all of us to re-imagine both what is necessary and what is possible, and I think it's having an impact on our politics," said Maurice Mitchell, national director of the Working Families Party, a New York-based minor political party.

I've been stranded in Kenya since March, trying to get a "repatriation" flight to return home to the United States. I was finally able to book a flight but I'm still not sure I'll be able to board at the scheduled departure time – a week from Saturday. Not only are cancellations part of the new normal for international flights, but passengers in some countries need to present evidence they're likely not infected with the novel coronavirus before being allowed to board.

Audrey just turned 18 and relishes crossing into adulthood: She voted for the first time this year, graduated high school and is college-bound next month. The honors student typically wakes up "a bundle of nerves," she says, which had fueled her work volunteering, playing varsity sports and leading student government.

But for years, she also struggled with anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder — all of which drove her to work harder.

Updated at 7:43 a.m. ET

On the eve of Independence Day, President Trump celebrated at the foot of Mount Rushmore National Memorial in Keystone, S.D., with a fireworks display and an impassioned speech against what he called a "new far-left fascism."

UPDATE (6:51 p.m. PT) - U.S. District Judge Michael H. Simon has issued a temporary restraining order against the city of Portland, placing new restrictions on how officers can interact with journalists and legal observers documenting the nightly protests against police violence. 

The order, issued Thursday evening, bars police from arresting or using physical force against anyone they "know or reasonably should know” is a journalist or legal observer - unless officers have probable cause that the person has committed a crime. 

UPDATE (Saturday, 12:43 p.m. PT) – Police broke up a group of several hundred protesters in downtown Portland overnight Thursday and into Friday morning. Crowd control munitions were used after protesters shot fireworks towards police, broke windows and set what appeared to be a small fire inside the federal courthouse, police said.

On Friday afternoon, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler called for an end to the protests that have turned violent.

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