food waste

Eat Smart Waste Less

When it comes to recovering recyclables out of the trash, Lane County is again ranked best in Oregon. While that’s good news, waste managers say we’ve still got a ways to go. Stay at Home orders have added new challenges in the effort to reduce waste.

Living Less Unsustainably: Clean Plate Club

Apr 20, 2020
John Fischer

I have a triple win situation for you. The winners are the planet, your pocketbook, and your dishwasher. The proposition: finish your food - all of it. 

City of Eugene

Now that we’re in the meat of the holiday food season, Eugene officials say the new city-wide curbside composting program is going smoothly.


Anni Katz

As of Tuesday, October 1st, Eugene residents can put food scraps in their curbside yard waste bins for composting. The hope is to reduce the amount of food that goes into the landfill.


Imperfect Produce Finds a New Way to Consumers

Sep 11, 2019
Imperfect Produce

Food waste is a large problem in the U.S. One reason for this is that produce that isn’t pretty doesn’t make it to supermarket shelves. A west-coast based grocery company brings fresh produce that doesn’t meet retail standards directly from local farms to consumers.

City of Eugene

If you garden, you know carrots, tomatoes and squash can grow in odd, non-standard shapes. Tons of food in Lane County is wasted each year because it's not pretty enough to be sold. Saturday in Eugene, 'Operation: Food Rescue' highlights ways to keep good produce from the garbage can.


Bart Everson / Flickr.com

For the first time since 2011, Lane County is tops for waste recovery in Oregon. KLCC’s Brian Bull has more.

APO / Flickr.com

A new venture in Corvallis hopes to keep leftovers from landfills. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the “Food Too Good To Waste” campaign just scored a $45,000 dollar grant from the state Department of Environmental Quality to that effect.

wikipedia

Eugene will start a pilot residential food waste collection program this fall. City Counselors will get an update at their work session Monday.

City of San Diego

A pile of food waste can make rich compost for the garden. But some Northwest companies are going beyond composting. This week we’ve been bringing you stories on the challenges of wasted food. We discovered three companies that are using it to power homes, race cars and city buses.

Remember that last scene in Back to the Future?

Doc: “Marty you’ve got to come with me.”
Marty: “Where?”
Doc: “Back to the Future.”

Doc tears into Marty’s driveway in the DeLorean time machine and raids the trash can.

Doc: “I need fuel”

Katie Campbell / Earthfix

Portland and Seattle are working to reduce the environmental impacts of food waste by offering curbside composting. But no one said it would be easy. We’ve been taking a look this week at the challenges and opportunities of wasted food.  Cassandra Profita from our EarthFix team looks at what two Northwest cities are doing to get people to put the right things in the compost bin.

Paul Kelly was assigned a new task this year. He's standing in a lake of purple liquid, picking through a pile of rotting food with a pitchfork.

In the U.S., we waste about 40 percent of all of the food we produce. A lot of that food winds up rotting in landfills and releasing air pollution. But many cities are trying to turn it into something more valuable and less harmful to the environment. EarthFix reporter Cassandra Profita kicks off our series of reports this week on food waste by exploring the virtues of curbside composting: