Brian Bull

Reporter

Brian Bull joined the KLCC News Team in June 2016.   In his 25 years as a public media journalist, he's worked at NPR, Twin Cities Public Television, South Dakota Public Broadcasting, Wisconsin Public Radio, and ideastream in Cleveland. His reporting has netted dozens of accolades, including four national Edward R. Murrow Awards (15 regional),  the Ohio Associated Press' Best Reporter Award, Best Radio Reporter from  the Native American Journalists Association, and the PRNDI/NEFE Award for Excellence in Consumer Finance Reporting.

An enrolled member of the Nez Perce Tribe, Bull has worked with NPR's Next Generation Project geared towards diversifying the ranks of tomorrow's journalists.  He's been a guest faculty instructor at the Poynter Institute on covering underrepresented communities.  He's served as chair for Vision Maker Media, which supports authentic programs and documentaries produced by Native Americans.

He's glad to be home in the Pacific Northwest, close to his family, tribe, and the Oregon Coast. If only someone had warned him about the grass seed pollen every spring!  Bull is married and has three children, and five cats. He enjoys photography, hiking, cooking, the visual and performing arts, and the occasional Godzilla movie.

Read how Brian's desire to spur reflection led him to a career in public media.

Brian has worked through the decades with NPR on its Next Generation Radio Project, which trains journalists from underrepresented communities to become tomorrow's reporters.  Check out his latest project with California State University-Northride (CSUN) in North LA here: https://csun2020.nextgenerationradio.org/

Ways to Connect

Inciweb

Fire crews across Oregon are increasingly gaining ground on some of the larger wildfires.

Photos provided by Solomon Singer. / Lane Community College

A firefighter and Lane Community College instructor has been helping out with the Holiday Farm Fire.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, Solomon Singer’s drone has made a difference.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Across Oregon, crews are mopping up on many major wildfires.  However, a warm spell next week could pose challenges.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Returning residents of the McKenzie River Corridor are being urged not to clean up damaged or destroyed homesteads following the Holiday Farm Fire. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

While crews continue to fight the Holiday Farm Fire and others around the state, evacuation notices for the region are being downgraded.  Officials are warning evacuees to be careful coming home. 

Marcus Kauffman / Oregon Dept. of Forestry

Heavy gusts and rain hit the region yesterday, which included the Holiday Farm Fire site. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how the weather affected operations.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The Holiday Farm Fire is now 27% contained. Fire crews are hopeful that rains that’ll come in tonight – and last through Saturday – will help them further control it. But high sustained winds today may complicate things.

Tom Atkinson

Many people evacuated from areas near the massive Holiday Farm Fire are returning home.  But locals from one of the most ravaged communities are facing severe hardships. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Mop-up operations on the Holiday Farm Fire are incorporating roughly a thousand firefighters from 18 states and Canada. It’s all part of a coordinated push to contain the fire as the weather stays cool and rainy.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Firefighters continue to battle the Holiday Farm Fire.  Since starting Labor Day evening, the fire has caused one fatality and destroyed nearly 800 buildings along the McKenzie River Corridor.  

Brian Bull / KLCC

More than two weeks after the Holiday Farm Fire erupted across the McKenzie Highway Corridor, fire crews are steadily gaining on the blaze.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Between the COVID-19 pandemic and a recent grant, the Eugene Mission has re-invented its work with the unhoused. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Rainy, cooler weather helped firefighters improve containment of the Holiday Farm Fire this weekend, which has consumed over 173,000 acres since Labor Day. It’s currently 14 percent contained, compared to 10 percent Friday.

U.S. Dept. of Energy / Flickr.com

Lane County Public Health has announced 20 more positive cases of COVID-19, one new death, and a new workplace cluster.

 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Incoming storms have helped clear the air and will hopefully dampen the chance of regional wildfires spreading.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Incoming storms have helped clear the air and will hopefully dampen the chance of regional wildfires spreading.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The Holiday Farm Fire is now 10% contained, and has consumed over 170,000 acres. It’s hoped that an incoming weather front will give fire crews some help, though it could pose its own risks.  KLCC's Rachael McDonald and reporter Brian Bull discuss the latest on the fire. 

Andy Nelson / Register Guard/pool

The Holiday Farm Fire has consumed over 170,000 acres, and destroyed more than 500 structures.  Some residents who fled last week have recently been able to return to check on their homes.  In the cause of Tim Laue, a former Eugene City Councilor and now Blue River resident, the experience was devastating: the home he and his wife shared, along with a guest cottage, were burned to the foundations.

KLCC’s Brian Bull talked to Laue about when he and his wife evacuated late Labor Day night.

Andy Nelson / Register-Guard/pool

The Holiday Farm Fire has scorched the McKenzie River Corridor area for more than a week now. Some residents from the ravaged areas have been allowed back to survey the damage.

Andy Nelson / Register-Guard/pool

The Eugene Mission has extended services and capacity in the wake of the Holiday Farm Fire.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Air quality indexes range from “unhealthy” to “hazardous” across the region, as wildfires continue to burn. And homeless people remain limited in options.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Evacuation levels are being downgraded for some areas around the Holiday Farm Fire that’s burned over 166,000 acres and destroyed more than 300 structures.  As can be expected, evacuees are more than ready to come home.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Ongoing wildfires have created a hazardous smog over the region, which can endanger people's health.  And homeless people are especially vulnerable to the poor air quality.

Inciweb

The Holiday Farm Fire has displaced hundreds of people from their homes and businesses.  And while the fire is slowly being fought back and increasingly contained, an official warns there are short --and long-term-- risks to returning to the affected areas. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Wildfire smoke has made the air dangerous to breathe across the Eugene-Springfield area.  But there is relief later in the week.

Brian Bull / KLCC

Dozens of American cities have reached out to a Eugene-based alternative policing program in the past few months.  With renewed attention on how policing is carried out following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, CAHOOTS is often referred to as an efficient alternative.

Bermix Studio / Unsplash

A finance industry analyst says COVID-19 fraud has cost Americans more than $124 million this year, which includes over $2 million gleaned from Oregonians.

U.S. Census Bureau

Last month, the U.S. Census Bureau revised an extended deadline from October 31st to the end of this month.  Many groups – including Native Americans in Oregon – aren’t pleased at the decision. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

If you’ve been at marches and protests across Oregon lately, you might have spotted – or even hugged – an unmistakable, fluffy figure: Caesar the No Drama Llama.  Tall, white, and furry from head to toe, Caesar and his handler, Larry McCool, have tried to be a calming force in a year of unrest.  KLCC’s Brian Bull produced this self-narrative of the duo.

Igor Rodrigues / Unsplash

With the COVID-19 pandemic causing economic upheaval through 2020, retailers’ prospects for the holiday shopping season look dicey.

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