Borders, Migration and Belonging: Native Voices

Jul 18, 2018

Statue of Amanda DuCuys
Credit Brian Bull

KLCC presents a year-long series on Native Voices of Oregon beginning July, 2018. 

Funded by the University of Oregon's Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, the stories coincide with the Center's 2017-2019 Theme of Inquiry: Borders, Migration and Belonging. 

The series is reported by KLCC's Brian Bull and Karen Richards.  Stories air monthly during Morning Edition and All Things Considered

This project is made possible by a grant from the KLCC Public Radio Foundation.

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Episode 1 - July 31, 2018
Amanda Trail Recognizes Displacement and Suffering of First Nations During Pioneer-Era by Brian Bull

Oregon’s history with the First Nations remains an often overlooked part of the state’s checkered legacy. But more and more, Native Americans and their supporters are highlighting aspects of Oregon’s pioneer era that may not jibe with tourist signs and old school textbooks. One story is that of Amanda Du-Cuys. U.S. soldiers put the Coos Indian and others on a forced march up the coastline in the 1860s.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how her story is being shared today.

Episode 2 - August 31, 2018
Native Oregon Names Tell Stories by Karen Richards
Many Oregon place names have Native American roots. Some of them teach lessons about the land and its history, others are more like a game of “telephone” played over time. KLCC's Karen Richards has a few stories about local place names.

Episode 3 - September 28, 2018
State and Community Work to Support Oregon's Native American Students by Brian Bull

Oregon’s Native American students largely struggle to keep pace with their non-Indian peers.  Graduation rates and attendance are low, while dropouts are high. In this months’ segment for the series “Native Voices of Oregon,” KLCC’s Brian Bull talks to Indian educators about the challenges their students face, and what’s being done to brighten their prospects.

Episode 4 - October 29, 2018
Tribal Business on Cusp of Change by Karen Richards

Oregon’s Native American tribes are well known for their casinos. What's less recognized is how tribes use their sense of place to start new businesses, and the diversity of those ventures.

Episode 5 - November 30, 2018
For Two Spirits, An Opportunity To Reclaim Acceptance Across Indian Country by Brian Bull

The term “Two Spirit” in Native American culture describes a person possessing both male and female spirits within themselves.  Many tribes held them in high regard, or at least accepted them. But after colonization and the integration of Judeo-Christian values, many Two Spirits were shunned, ridiculed, and even assaulted.  And while “Two Spirit” has been used for Indians who identify as gay, bisexual, or transgender…many say there’s more to it than that.  KLCC’s Brian Bull explores a community that’s finding its voice again after generations of oppression, prejudice, and oversight.

 

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View previous KLCC series funded by the Wayne Morse Center for Law & Politics:
2016 -  The Future of Public Education in Oregon
2017 -  Borders, Migration and Belonging: Immigration in Oregon

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