Urban Growth Boundary

City of Eugene

Eugene’s housing market is tight. As the city looks to future population growth, it’s trying to prepare for even more demand. Eugene seeks public input on options for Multi-family housing.

Bend Asking Residents For Urban Growth Boundary Input

Sep 24, 2015
bendugb.metroquest.com

The City of Bend grew 47 percent between 2000 and 2010. In order to accommodate this boom, the city is asking for community feedback on how to expand. KLCC’s Corinne Boyer has more.

Bend is offering an online survey as an alternative to attending the upcoming Urban Growth Boundary planning meeting.

Anne Aurand (Or-and) with the city says the online survey is also an educational tool designed to help people understand more about growth scenarios.

Springfield Will Not Expand into College View

Sep 16, 2015
Rachael McDonald

Neighbors who opposed Springfield's plans to expand into an area West of Mount Pisgah can breathe a sigh of relief. The City Council decided Monday not to increase the urban growth boundary into the controversial College View area.

Springfield City Councilors proposed new sites for urban growth — and did not include a contentious area near Mount Pisgah known as College View. The City's Anette Spickard says North Gateway and the Mill Race were chosen after extensive analysis.
 

City of Eugene

Eugene is working on a plan for growth into the next two decades. The City Council Monday approved a "baseline" Urban Growth Boundary crafted by its Envision Eugene project.

Several years ago, Envision Eugene got started, mapping a course for the city's future into 2032 when its population is expected to grow by 34 thousand. Terri Harding is Principal Planner:

City of Eugene

Eugene and Springfield have been sharing an Urban Growth Boundary since 1982. In 2007, the state legislature passed a law requiring the two cities to establish separate UGB's.  Eugene's Principle Planner Teri Harding speaks with KLCC's Rachael McDonald.

City of Eugene website

Seavey Loop Residents To Fast In Front Of City Hall

Nov 13, 2014
City of Springfield

Residents against Springfield's proposal to expand the Urban Growth Boundary to nearby Seavey Loop are using an old protest tactic: fasting.

The citizen's coalition known as "No Industrial Pisgah" is organizing the fast all day Friday (Nov. 14) and Saturday (Nov. 15) in front of Springfield City Hall. Charles Stewart owns an organic farm in Seavey Loop. He says the proposal isn't compatible with surrounding agriculture practices.

Tiffany Eckert

Landowners, small farmers and urban park enthusiasts exercised their First Amendment rights today (Wednesday) with a march on Springfield City Hall. They want the city to immediately abandon plans to place an industrial zone near the entrance to one of the largest urban parks in the world…Buford Park. KLCC's Tiffany Eckert was on the march route and has this story.

(chants)