Eric Richardson

Deonna Anderson/KLCC

The history and legacy of the African American community in Eugene dates back to at least the 1890s. Now, there’s an effort to preserve the historic property of one Black family in particular – the Mims.

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A federal jury has ruled in favor of Eugene Police in an excessive force civil lawsuit against the department. The case was brought by a woman and her son who were arrested after calling for help because the young man was in mental health crisis.

University of Cincinatti.

An astrophysicist has used census data to create a map showing racial diversity in the U.S.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on how Eugene fares.

Photo by Eric Alan

Families can get a taste of Eugene history this Friday amid Thanksgiving leftovers and shopping.
The Eugene / Springfield NAACP is having an open house on Black Friday. They’re opening the historic Mims House near Skinner’s Butte in Eugene.

Tiffany Eckert / KLCC

A Eugene police auditor says an officer used excessive force during last year’s arrest of two relatives of the local NAACP president.

University of Oregon

University of Oregon president Michael Schill is asking for input on a proposal to remove the names of two men with racist histories from campus buildings. A new report by three historians sheds more light on Matthew Deady and Frederick Dunn.

The Mosaic: Black Activism in Eugene

Jun 6, 2016

Recorded on: July 3, 2016

Air Date: July 6th, 2016

Speakers:

  • Tarik Richardson, UO Gilman Scholar
  • Shaniece Curry, Black Women of Achievement
  • Willie Mims, Trustee, Mims Historical Houses
  • Eric Richardson, President, NAACP of Eugene and Springfield

Coordinator:  Mary Leighton

Photo by Eric Alan

  The Mims House became the first black-owned property in Eugene in 1948, after previous ordinances prohibited people of color from purchasing property or living within city limits. Eric Alan speaks with Willie Mims about the living history there, including visits from Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

Rachael McDonald

A federal lawsuit filed Thursday says Eugene police used excessive force and wrongfully arrested an African-American mother and son last summer. The suit was brought by the sister and nephew of the head of the Eugene chapter of the NAACP.

NAACP

The Executive Director of the NAACP in Lane County says Eugene Police used excessive force on his sister after she tried to stop an officer from deploying a stun gun on her 19-year-old son. EPD is conducting an internal investigation.

 

Ayisha Brown called police early on the morning of July 16th saying her 19-year old son was having a psychotic break.  Police provided audio from a patrol car camera.

Recorded on: July 24th, 2015

Air Date: July  27th, 2015 

Social justice activists, community leaders, educators, professionals, and students gather in Philadelphia July 11-15 for the 106th annual convention of the NAACP. At the City Club meeting on July 24, Eric Richardson (president, Eugene-Springfield NAACP) will share his experience at the convention. Members of the faith and social justice communities will join him to explore the conversations that must take place as we work together for social justice.

Karen Richards

Several hundred marchers gathered in Eugene today to honor Martin Luther King Junior.

 Speakers including Lane County NAACP president Eric Richardson and Congressman Peter DeFazio kicked off the event. Dr. King’s words “darkness cannot drive out darkness only light can do that,” had impact on the bright sunny morning. Several participants thought the race and equality issues of the past year brought energy to this year’s holiday. Eva Bertoglio is a student from Newberg:

KLCC's Claude Offenbacher spoke Tuesday with Eric Richardson.  He asked the Lane County NAACP president his reaction to the decision not to indict the white policeman who fatally shot an African-American youth in Ferguson, Missouri.  What did Richardson think we should take away from the Grand Jury's position?

Experiencing Inequality In Law Enforcement

Nov 10, 2014

Recorded on: Friday, November 7, 2014

Air Date: Monday, November 10, 2014

Experiencing Inequity in Law Enforcement

An orderly civil society requires a law enforcement focus on an effective and efficient balance between prevention and intervention. In healthy communities, everyone depends on the professional judgment of sworn officers to ensure safety. When public funds are scarce, it is especially important to make every police action count.