April Ehrlich

April Ehrlich began freelancing for Jefferson Public Radio in the fall of 2016, and then officially joined the team as its Morning Edition Host and a Jefferson Exchange producer in August 2017.

She previously worked as a reporter for the Roseburg News-Review, where she covered city government and housing. Before that, she covered the oil and gas industry and local government on the Oregon-Idaho border.

April served a two-year stint with AmeriCorps, where she worked with nonprofits helping low-income communities in rural Oregon. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in English at Cal-State University, Fullerton, where she worked as an editor for the campus paper.

When she is not at work or napping between shifts, April is likely hiking through nearby forests with a rambunctious border collie, or reading fiction at home with her two favorite cats.

 

In an effort to keep illegal marijuana out of the black market, an Oregon state commission has assigned grant funds to help counties beef up patrols. Southern Oregon is getting most of those funds.

A good chunk of the illegal weed pouring out of Oregon is grown in rural areas with underfunded sheriff’s departments, including Josephine and Jackson counties. That’s why lawmakers passed a bill that would open up 1.5 million dollars to counties wanting extra law enforcement.

Dozens of wildfires are filling the West Coast skies with thick smoke. In Southern Oregon, unhealthy air has forced people to wear smoke-filtering masks almost every day for more than a month. It has become part of the norm.

But in recent weeks, people have gotten tired of wearing the plain white paper masks every day. Instead, they’re investing in nicer ones made of fabric, and some even have artsy designs.

Noa Traylor of Weed, California, found his mask online. It’s a black fabric mask with a white decal of a zipper.

Hundreds of Redding residents didn’t have much notice before they heard sirens blaring through their neighborhoods Thursday night, calling for immediate evacuations. People who left were snagged by traffic. If they tried to find a hotel, they were likely out of luck; most were booked solid clear down to Sacramento.

So they ended at an evacuation center, like the one at Shasta College. Cots covered the gym floors, and despite the midday noise, many evacuees slept solidly. They were exhausted. It was hot. And they didn’t know when they could return home, or if their home was left standing.

Wildfires are pouring smoke into the valleys of southern Oregon, making hazardous air that’s nearly unbreathable.

UPDATE: As of Sunday morning, the Klamathon fire has grown to 30,500 acres and is 25 percent contained. The fire continues to spread into the Klamath National Forest. 

Ten people are reported missing in the Siskiyou County area.

One Hornbrook resident has died, and one firefighter is hospitalized with severe burns, but he is expected to make a full recovery. The agencies didn't provide more information about the people who are missing or the person who has died.