2017 solar eclipse

NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr/NOAA Photo Library / Flickr.com

Prior to Monday’s solar eclipse, we talked to an Oregon State University researcher about how the event might affect the world’s largest mass migration. KLCC’s Brian Bull has an update. 

William Huggins / Flickr.com

Among the countless millions of people who viewed yesterday’s solar eclipse, were firefighters across the Pacific Northwest.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, suppression efforts in Oregon were actually helped by the event. 

Brian Bull

As the moment of the total solar eclipse approaches this morning people are gathering to watch the moon pass over the sun. While thousands are in the path of totality, Eugene is expected to experience more than 99 percent totality. KLCC’s Brian Bull climbed Spencer’s Butte early this morning to get a good view.

Ali Burcin Titizel / Flickr.com

Monday's solar eclipse is drawing crowds to many public areas, including parks.  So Lane County officials are asking locals and visitors alike to “pack it in and pack it out”, so excess garbage and waste is kept to a minimum. 

Pintrist

Here’s an eclipse story for the books. On August 11, 1999, a total eclipse touched the tip of the United Kingdom at Cornwall. Oregonian author and counter-cultural icon, Ken Kesey, and his band of Merry Pranksters planned a festival to coincide with the solar event. They loaded their techno-color bus on a ship and forty Pranksters traveled “across the pond” to see what they could see.

jimnista / Flickr.com

While millions of people will be looking up to witness the solar eclipse this Monday, some will be monitoring the ocean for its effects on what an Oregon researcher calls the “largest mass migration on the planet”, among other things.  KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.

Gydion M. Williams / Flickr.com

Millions of people are expected to watch Monday’s solar eclipse, and many will opt to watch from the Oregon Coast.  As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, officials urge caution near the ocean.  

inciweb

Tens of Thousands of people have to change their plans for next Monday’s solar eclipse because wildfire has closed some prime viewing sites in the Willamette National Forest.

Wikipedia

The total solar eclipse is just a week away and Oregon transportation officials are bracing for the influx of up to one million visitors to the state. They’re urging travelers to treat it as a 3 or 4 day event even though the eclipse itself will only last 3 hours. 

Rachael McDonald

Excitement is building among scientists and the general public about the upcoming solar eclipse which passes through Oregon Monday August 21st. KLCC's Rachael McDonald speaks with a University of Oregon Astronomer.

St. Charles Health Systems

As the date of the solar eclipse approaches, hospitals across the state are in emergency preparedness mode. In central Oregon, St. Charles Health System anticipates a huge increase in demand for medical services and supplies.

Steve Wyatt

One month from today, more than a million visitors are expected to be in Oregon for the total solar eclipse. Planning has been going on for years and is kicking into high gear. On the coast there are special concerns – and opportunities – for residents and tourists.

NASA

The total solar eclipse is 2 months away. Scientists shared their excitement at a NASA briefing Wednesday, but transportation officials in Oregon, and other states the eclipse will pass over, are bracing for cosmic traffic jams.