cascadian earthquake

Recorded On: October 25, 2019

Air Date: October 28, 2019

From the City Club of Eugene:

Brian Bull / KLCC

Scientists say there’s a 1-in-3 chance of a powerful earthquake hitting the Pacific Northwest in the next 50 years. Residents of the Cascadia Subduction Zone are advised to stockpile two weeks’ worth of water, food, and medical supplies should the “Big One” strike. As part of our series on Oregon's Natural Resources and Resilience funded by the UO Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics, KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, economic disparities already divide those who can readily prepare, and those who will struggle to.

Brian Bull / KLCC

The possible threats from a large earthquake, wildfire, or flood drew locals to the City of Eugene’s emergency preparedness fair at the Park Blocks today. 

Brian Bull / KLCC

Progress on what’s billed as one of the first “vertical evacuation” sites in the U.S. is proceeding steadily. KLCC’s Brian Bull gives an update on Oregon State University’s Marine Studies Building in Newport.

Brian Bull / KLCC

An earthquake preparedness program drew nearly 200 people to South Eugene High School last night. As KLCC’s Brian Bull reports, the essentials of surviving a Cascadian event was the focus.

Great Oregon ShakeOut

If the Cascadia earthquake happened right now, would you know what to do? That’s the question emergency preparedness planners want you to ask yourself in advance of Thursday's Great Oregon ShakeOut.

US AID Indonesia / Flickr.com

If any bipartisanship still exists in Congress, it’s on earthquake preparedness. A bill that aims to reduce risks to life and property has cleared the U.S. Senate.  KLCC's Brian Bull reports.

Recorded On: March 9, 2018

Air Date: March 12, 2018

Over the last few decades, advancement in our understanding of the dynamics of the earth's surface and the geology of the Cascadia region has revealed that this region is subject to high intensity earthquakes. This is a result of the collision of large elements of the earth's crust called plates. Earthquakes of this type occur less frequently than those from horizontally moving faults like the San Andreas, but they are often of much larger magnitude.

welcome_to_nunavik / Flickr.com

State transportation crews in Oregon are now readying bridges, tunnels, and other infrastructure for a potentially powerful Cascadian earthquake. KLCC’s Brian Bull reports.