climate change

Eugene City Council To Vote On Climate Change Ordinance

Jul 28, 2014
City of Eugene

The Eugene City Council is set to vote on a Climate Recovery Ordinance tonight. The proposal includes a plan to reduce the city's output of greenhouse gasses, monitor progress, and requires the city manager to bring back a community gas reduction goal. Councilor Alan Zelenka proposed the ordinance. He says the majority of Eugenians showed support for the measure during the public comment period last week.

Mariordo Mario Roberto Duran Ortiz / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, the U-S Supreme Court declined to hear a challenge to California’s clean fuel law. Supporters of the law – and of similar efforts in Oregon and Washington – say the high court’s decision clears the way for the West Coast to take the lead in reducing planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. But opponents in the petroleum industry say the law is still a bad idea.

Courtney Flatt

When you think of grapes in the Northwest, wine is probably the first thing that comes to mind. But Concord juice grapes actually are Washington’s most widely planted grape. It turns out, juice grapes are more susceptible to warming weather than their wine grape cousins.

The sun beats down as researcher Markus Keller leans in to inspect his experimental concord grape vineyard.

Keller: “As you can see here, there’s a lot of flowers forming on the different shoots.”

The grape leaves hang down like a curtain over the rows of vines. This year’s crop looks to be strong.

courts.oregon.gov

A lawsuit brought by two Eugene teens against the state over climate change will get a second hearing in Lane County Circuit Court. The Oregon Court of Appeals Wednesday  ruled the case has merit.

Rachael McDonald

The Oregon Court of Appeals is expected to issue its ruling Wednesday in a lawsuit filed by two teens who want the state to do more to prevent climate change. One of the plaintiffs in the case, Kelsey Juliana, is about to graduate from high school. KLCC's Rachael McDonald spoke with her recently about what's next.

I met up with Kelsey Juliana at Amazon Park. As we walked the 18 year old told me her plans.

Juliana: "I will be graduating from South Eugene High School June 14th. And then, I will be leaving mid-July to join the Great March for Climate Action."

At the urging of the community's young people, the Eugene City Council is considering an ordinance that would make its carbon emission reduction goals mandatory instead of voluntary. The council voted Tuesday to hold a public hearing July 21st on the Climate Recovery Proposal. It would call on the community to cut fossil fuel use in half by 2030 compared to 2010 levels. City Councilor Alan Zelenka spoke in support of the ordinance.

Changing Attitudes About Climate Change

May 5, 2014

Recorded on : May 2, 2014

Air Date: May 5, 2014

City Club’s May 2nd speaker will not discuss whether climate change is occurring or conjecture about whether human behavior contributes to that change. Affirmative answers to both of those questions are taken as given.

Eugene Celebrates A Windy Earth Day

Apr 19, 2014
Desmond O'Boyle

Despite rainy and windy conditions, hundreds of people celebrated Earth Day Saturday in the Eugene Water and Electric Board's downtown parking lot. The wind seemed to be more of a factor than the rain. Elizabeth Brown is with the organization "Our Children's Trust" who operated a booth at Earth Day. She says they tied their booth next to two adjacent ones.

What Does Climate Change Mean For Ice Climbing?

Mar 10, 2014
Courtney Flatt

Ice climbers are a lot like snowboarders and skiers – they count on winter weather to create the right conditions for their sport. But here’s a big difference: mountain resorts can manufacture snow; no one has invented a machine to freeze waterfalls. And as winter temperatures rise, outdoor recreationalists worry that climate change could threaten some ice climbing destinations.

High up in Washington’s Blue Mountains, behind trees and across the Touchet River, is what locals call the Weeping Wall.

Former NASA Scientist James Hansen On Climate Change

Mar 4, 2014
Cassandra Profita

Until last year, James Hansen ran the Goddard Institute for Space Studies at NASA. In that role, he issued some of the earliest warnings about the risks of climate change.

Hansen was in Eugene this past weekend to give a keynote speech at the Environmental Law Conference. Before the speech, Hansen sat down with EarthFix reporter Cassandra Profita to talk about his new life as a public speaker and climate scientist at Columbia University.

Q: Dr. Hansen, it's been almost a year since you left NASA. How has your work changed?

Environmental philosopher and author Kathleen Dean Moore will present a talk in Corvallis on Sunday, November 17th entitled, “For the Beauty of the Earth: The Moral Urgency of Climate Action.” She speaks with Eric Alan about that topic, and her new book Moral Ground: Ethical Action for a Planet in Peril. That book, co-edited with Michael P. Nelson, gathers the perspectives of the world's moral leaders on what actions we need to take and why.

Cassandra Profita

Climate change models are predicting hotter summers in the Northwest. And experts say the health risks from that heat are higher in places known as urban heat islands. In the third installment of our series, ‘Symptoms of Climate Change,’ EarthFix reporter Cassandra Profita explains how dark pavement and rooftops in these city neighborhoods make hot weather more hazardous to human health.

Stephens: “Oh, kitty you’ll have to get down. Come on. Shoo.”

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